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Project Summary Sheet

U.S Geological Survey, South Florida Ecosystem Program: Place-Based Studies

Project: A Synthesis of Sediment Production, Transport, and Accumulation in Florida Bay

Web Sites: http://www.sfrestore.org/documents/ifp99/index.html, http://sofia.usgs.gov/, http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/flbay.

Location: Central Everglades (including Florida Bay)

Principal Investigator: Robert B. Halley, Geologist USGS 600 4th St. S. St. Petersburg, FL 33701
727-803-8747 x3020, 727-803-2032 (FAX), rhalley@usgs.gov

Project Personnel:

Other Supporting Organizations: USGS, SFWMD, ENP, NOAA

Associated Projects: Buttonwood Embankment, (Holmes); Remote Sensing of Florida Bay, (Stumpf); Bathymetry of Florida Bay, (Hansen); Geochemical Monitoring of Florida Bay, (Yates); Geochemistry of Wetland Sediments from South Florida, (Orem); Mudbank Seagrass Die-off, (Carlson)

Overview & Status: Project elements include the following processes: 1) modern rates of carbonate sediment production from radiocarbon measurements and geochemical measurements, mineralogical and chemical composition processes of erosion and deposition, resuspension and transport), recent deposition and the geography , geometry and biogeochemistry of net accumulation . Carbonate productivity in the Bay can be calculated using three methods. 1. accumulated sediments and dating to determine rates of sediment production Standing crop and turnover rate to determine short-term productivity and geochemical methods to determine short-term productivity and carbonate precipitation. Large discrepancies exist between the long-term and short-term productivity measures.. This geochemical validation and proposed sediment budget will indicate whether there has been a long-term change in the productivity of the Bay or if current processes can account for the differences inapparent sediment production and accumulation.

Needs & Products: Future ecosystem-scale changes in Florida Bay depend on changes in circulation that are, in part, a function of water depth. Water depth, in turn, changes in response to sea-level rise and changes in bathymetry. Several future sea-level rise scenarios have been published. This project defines the processes and rates of bathymetric change that, together with a sea-level rise prediction, allow water depths to be predicted and circulation changes to be modeled.

Products include several journal articles and USGS Open File reports as follows: Florida Bay salinity maps, surface and bottom salinity: the South Florida environment: Bottom types of Florida Bay: Sedimentary and biological environments, depth to Pleistocene bedrock, and Holocene sediment and reefthickness, Key Largo, South Florida; Geology and hydrogeology of the Florida; First-order time-averaged fluxes of 137Cs, 239+240Pu and Pb fluxes to 210Pb-dated sediments of Florida: Reconstructing the history of eastern and central Florida Bay using mollusk-shell isotope records: Sedimentary dynamics of Florida Bay Mud Banks on adecadal time scale.

Abstracts of Presentations at Meetings include: Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in selected mollusks from Florida Bay: a paleoenvironmental perspective: Analyzing the isotopic composition of coral and mollusk skeletons to relate past salinity and nutrient levels in Florida Bay, Florida Bay mudbanks: relatively new piles of mostly old sediments: The dual roles of Florida Bay mudbanks in restoration: Seagrass facies and phases recorded in the sediments of Florida Bay: Florida Bay bottom-type map: West Everglades winter freshets during the current wet period and seasonal phase shifts in salinity cycles across Florida Bay: Increased salinity of Florida Bay and saltwater intrusion of the Biscayne aquifer during the early 20th century: simultaneous consequences of falling water tables along the margins of the Everglades: Providing a framework for assessment and restoration of the Everglades ecosystem: an example of the use of paleoecologic and geochemical data in Florida Bay: Sea-level rise and the future of Florida Bay in the next century.

Documents in preparation for FY2000 include: Finding the very recent past in Florida Bay: Identifying bomb radiocarbon in carbonate sediments: Sea-level rise and the future of Florida bay in the next century.

Application to Everglades Restoration:

Study Milestones

(Phase 1 & Phase II)

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Familiarity

xxxx

xx

                 

Design

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxx

             

Field Work

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xx

xx

           

Data Analysis

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

         

Initial Reporting

 

x

xxxx

xxxx

             

Credibility Assurance

 

xx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

         

Results Published

 

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

         

Synthesis

 

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

xxxx

         

Note: "x" indicates task completed, and "o" indicates task planned, but not completed


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Last updated: 24 April, 2014 @ 12:00 PM (KP)