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Last updated: January 15, 2013
South Florida Restoration Science Forum

Sustainable Agriculture

How can sugarcane research in the Everglades Agricultural Area enable natural land managers and farmers to work together to reduce phosphorus and restore natural hydrology?

Part 3: Conserving Organic Soils in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA)

Before the EAA was drained, its organic soils increased in depth at the rate of 0.03 inches per year. Since drainage in the early 1900's, the soils lost depth at the rate of 1 inch per year until 1978. Since 1978, the loss of soil has been reduced to about 1/2 inch per year.

Our agricultural research goal in the EAA is to provide the knowledge needed to farm profitably and conserve the soil. As such, the EAA could benefit the natural Everglades.

photo of Charles Freeman beside subsidence post
Charles Freeman kneeling beside
the subsidence post in Belle Glade in 1969
photo of George Snyder beside post
George Snyder standing beside the post in 1979
photo of George Snyder beside post
George Snyder standing beside the post in 1989


Next Next: Sugarcane Physiology Research For Environmentally Sustainable Production


U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Center for Coastal Geology
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Last updated: 15 January, 2013 @ 12:44 PM (HSH)